Selecting text in Word

I tend to do a lot of clicking and dragging the cursor to select text in Word. But these two tips are very useful for saving time and effort when it comes to grabbing sentences and paragraphs.

The Properties Pane is back in Office ProPlus

When we first started upgrading to Office ProPlus (aka Office 2016), we were excited and happy… until someone noticed that the Properties Pane for things like Word, Excel, and PowerPoint documents was no longer visible. Needless to say, this made some of our customers “not very happy”.

Somewhere along the way, Microsoft fixed that problem in the Office clients, and now you can once again see and access the properties. Here’s how you do it…

Using AutoText in Word Quick Parts

When you’re in Word, you often have to use certain blocks of text in many different documents. Instead of typing the same content over and over (or using copy and paste from something like Notepad), check out the Quick Parts AutoText feature instead…

Making the Word calculator a bit more useful

A colleague sent me an email after last week’s tip on creating a calculator in Word. She wondered if you could create a “spreadsheet” of claims in Word, and use the calculator to add up the claim totals. Much to my surprise, you *can* do something like what she suggested.

Quick charting from within Word

Normally if I have a chart that I want to add to a Word document, I create it in Excel and then copy and paste it over. However, Word has a decent charting function that makes it pretty easy to add basic charting on the fly.

Did you know about the “spike” function in Word?

OK… this tip borders on pure magic, and I had never heard of it before. The spike function in Word allows you to cut multiple sections in a Word document, and then paste them together in a single function. No more “cut, then paste, then cut, then paste, etc…”

Adding a “calculator” to Word

This is one of those things that I find more interesting than useful, but I can also see how some people might find this to be just the tool they need. So, with that… here’s how to add a calculator to Word. 🙂

Free tech books and documents from Microsoft!

It’s that time of year again!

Each year, Eric Ligman from Microsoft has a blog entry that posts links to a LARGE collection of FREE ebooks on Microsoft technology. There’s no catch, it’s all legal, and it’s simply a “thank you” to everyone who is a Microsoft customer or partner. They are full versions of the titles, they are not time-bombed, etc. They are really and truly FREE for downloading.