The History Menu in Microsoft Teams

If you spend most of your day in Microsoft Teams, you know how difficult it is to bounce back and forth between various teams, apps, tabs, and so forth. If you have to go to a new workspace, you then have to try and figure out where you were before. Microsoft has now made it easier to get back and forth between areas by giving you a History Menu in the upper-left corner of the Teams client, much like the forward and backward buttons in a browser. Here’s how it works…

Planner now has 25 labels to use for tasks

When Planner first came out, you had six labels to use for categorizing and filtering your tasks. Depending on how much filtering and refining you wanted to do, you had to be pretty brutal in what to include and what to leave out. However, Planner now provides 25(!) labels, so you have a lot more flexibility in how to label and report on your tasks. Here’s how it works…

Queuing Microsoft Teams messages when you’re offline

It used to be that when you were disconnected from the internet, any messages you tried to send in Microsoft Teams would end up giving you a failure message. You could retry, but if you’re disconnected, it wasn’t going to go anywhere. Now, Microsoft Teams will queue up those unsent messages for 24 hours, meaning you can continue to work and respond to messages even though you’re disconnected. Here’s how that works…

Tracking action items in a Microsoft Word web document

There are times when you’d like to keep track of things to do in a document, such as reminders to find more information, get reviews from particular people, and so forth. When you’re using Word on the web for a document stored in SharePoint Online or OneDrive, you can now do that with the Follow-up and @mention features. Here’s how that works…

Viewing site usage data for your SharePoint Online site

One of the common requests we get on the SharePoint team is whether or not someone can get site usage statistics for their SharePoint site. My usual answer is a qualified “yes”, as they normally want something more detailed than what SharePoint provides. I hope that someday the site usage data becomes more detailed, but until then, here’s what we have and how it works…

Creating and saving files directly in SharePoint Online and OneDrive

If you’ve been working with computers prior to “the cloud”, it’s very easy to have your behavior default to saving your files to your local hard drive or a file share. However, now with SharePoint Online and OneDrive, doing that limits the opportunities you have to work with the files in new and collaborative ways. Instead, start creating and saving your files directly to SharePoint document libraries or your OneDrive space. Here’s how that works…